Endowed in perpetuity by the Glenna Luschei Fund for Excellence

May 2012

The Monster in the Room

On Writing With and Without the Internet

Recently I invested $10 of my hard-earned Teaching Assistant’s salary on the software program Freedom. Freedom is a software program that, according to its website, “locks you away from the 'net so you can be productive.” If you’re a writer or someone else who wants to be forced to concentrate on a boring old MS Word screen, you simply plug in the amount of time you want to be internet-free and Freedom disables your connection, infuriatingly refusing to respond no matter how many times you click your Safari icon, not unlike that scene in Young Frankenstein where Victor Frankenstein tells Igor and Inga to lock him in the room with the monster and never let him out, no matter what he says.

Maurice Sendak, Instigator

Richard Graham remembers the artist's provocative side

This is the fourth installment of an ongoing series written for the blog by Richard Graham. Richard is an associate professor and media services librarian at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where he studies the educational use of comics and serves as the film and art history liaison. His posts examine UNL’s, Nebraska’s, and the larger literary world’s connections with the comics medium.

“The Postcolonial Should Perhaps Eat Itself!”

A Q&A with Professor David Richards on Postcolonial Literature

This is the third in a series of blog posts by guest contributor Nabina Das on Indian books and authors. In this post, Das interviews Professor David Richards of the University of Stirling.

Summer Issue Cover!

To whet your appetite for our forthcoming Summer Issue, check out its beautiful cover!

This startling image was shot in Provincia Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, by German artists Cenci Goepel and Jens Warnecke,

The photo is part of a series called "Lightmark." According to the artists' website, Lightmark "was created by photographing moving light sources at night. Long exposures, up to an hour in length, are required to allow torchlight to take form and for the very low level of ambient light, usually from the moon, to illuminate the scenery. Using a digital medium format camera for their photography, Goepel and Warnecke focus on photographic techniques rather than post processing to achieve the results they are aiming for. The couple travel all over the world in search of locations with secret natures they seek to reveal through their light paintings."

After UNL

An Interview with NSWC Faculty and UNL Alums Dave Madden, emily danforth and Lee Martin!

The Nebraska Summer Writer’s Conference comes to UNL in just a month. As usual, the faculty is full of writers with some sort of Nebraska connection; this year, however, NSWC is bringing in no fewer than three former UNL graduate writing program alums to teach workshops! Prairie Schooner, in partnership with the NSWC, conducted the following interview with these three faculty alums: Dave Madden, emily danforth, and Lee Martin.

Interviewee Bios:

How Games Fail to Teach: Christian Videogames and the “Problem of Content”

This is the third in a series of guest posts by Hali Sofala and Eric Jones on the connections between gaming (video and otherwise) and the literary.

Around the Office: Scott Winter

Short interviews with Prairie Schooner editors and staff members.

Scott Winter hosts Air Schooner along with Stacey Waite. An assistant professor at UNL's College of Journalism and Mass Communications, he teaches media ethics, sportswriting and magazine design, though both his degrees are from English departments, including Nebraska's in 2007. He takes students on international reporting trips, and has taught in Ethiopia, Kosovo and India. Outside work, he plays ugly tennis with his beautiful wife, watches Arrested Development reruns with his daughter and plans baseball excursions with his son.

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There have been eight Air Schooner episodes so far. Which has been your favorite, and why?

Berlin International Film Festival

Part II

This is the fifth installment of an ongoing series written for the blog by Peter Rorvik. Peter is the Director of the Centre for Creative Arts at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, as well as Director of the Durban International Film Festival.