Endowed in perpetuity by the Glenna Luschei Fund for Excellence

Briefly Noted: Latino/a Literature in the Classroom edited by Frederick Luis Aldama

by Daniel A. Olivas
Daniel A. Olivas on "Latino/a Literature in the Classroom: Twenty-first-century approaches to teaching": "the first volume of its type" .. "scholarly yet practical" .. "there's little doubt this volume will become a mainstay" .. click here to read!

"I look, and love even harder": an interview with Michael Schmeltzer

The Prairie Schooner Book Prize is now open through March 15th. Book Prize Coordinator Katie Schmid Henson will interview poets and fiction writers throughout the prize period, in celebration of the art of the book. This week, Michael Schmeltzer discusses storytelling as the art of memory, his preoccupation with shadow and absence, and what writers owe their communities. 

'What is the self and how can I trust it?': an interview with Carmiel Banasky

The Prairie Schooner Book Prize is now open through March 15th. Book Prize Coordinator Katie Schmid Henson will interview poets and fiction writers throughout the prize period, in celebration of the art of the book. This week, Carmiel Banasky talks mental illness, representation, and the question of accessibility in experimental and popular fiction. 

How many books have you published, and where?

The Suicide of Claire Bishop is my debut novel, published by Dzanc Books in September 2015. It has been quite a ride!

Briefly Noted: Coming Home from Camp and Other Poems by Lonny Kaneko

by Muriel Nelson
Muriel Nelson reviews Lonny Kaneko's "Coming Home from Camp and Other Poems," which is a deep meditation on concentration camps run in the United States during World War II.

Briefly Noted: Garments Against Women by Anne Boyer

reviewed by Michael Lindgren
12/7/16-- Michael Lindgren reviews Anne Boyer's freewheeling book of prose poetry "Garments Against Women", a text that improvises on themes of feminist identity, precarity, illness, the nature of capital, and the twin poles of production and consumerism.

"Who is American? How do we decide, and who decides?" an interview with E.M. Tran

by Sarah Fawn Montgomery

SFM: Why are you drawn to the genre of nonfiction? What about its history or form speaks to you? What compels you to write about truth, history, and your own experience?

"Too hurt by the light not to write about it": a conversation with Emily Skaja

The Sillerman First Book Prize closes today! To celebrate, Book Prize Coordinator Katie Schmid Henson talks with emerging writers about the book publication process. This week, award-winning poet (and future winner of the Pulitzer) Emily Skaja talks to her best friend and one-time roommate about Lucie Brock-Broido, how sending out your unsolicited manuscript is almost exactly like sexting, and whether or not the void can be said to GAF.

Dear Emily: Can you tell me about your first book? What's it about? What does it do?

Hope Wabuke on the work of the poet

The Sillerman First Book Prize closes soon! To celebrate, Book Prize Coordinator Katie Schmid Henson talks with emerging writers about the book publication process. This week, UNL's own award-winning poet Hope Wabuke discusses finding her way into form, her enduring love for Sharon Olds, and what she's reading and teaching right now.

How many books have you published, and where?

"I began each day by wrestling a tiger": an Interview with Steven Church

by Sarah Fawn Montgomery

One with the Tiger, Steven Church’s fifth book of nonfiction, is a book-length essay both animal and human, a hybrid text that confronts readers with power and earnestness through subject and craft. Inspired by the story of David Villalobos, a young man who jumped into the tiger pen at the Bronx Zoo, Church takes a leap of his own—to explore animal instinct alongside human wildness, to trace that wavering line between predator and prey, civilized and savage. Weaving reflections on animal violence and human fear with extensive research about everything from Charla Nash to the Werner Herzog documentary, Grizzly Man, the book is Montaignian in approach, taking up the classic essay’s attempt to understand the self by following the mind, form mirroring intellectual endeavor.

"I tried to be ruthless": poet Kirun Kapur on editing a first manuscript

The Sillerman First Book Prize is now open through December 1st. To celebrate, Book Prize Coordinator Katie Schmid Henson talks with emerging writers about the book publication process. This week, poet Kirun Kapur discusses her award-winning book Visiting Indira Gandhi's Palmist, and all the 'glinting' in the manuscript that didn't make the cut. 

Describe the process of constructing your first manuscript. How did you conceive of ordering the collection?

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