Endowed in perpetuity by the Glenna Luschei Fund for Excellence

Women and the Global Imagination: The Center of the Universe

by Nancy Jooyoun Kim

In our Winter 2014 issue Alicia Ostriker curated a poetry portfolio on Women and the Global Imagination, and we were so struck by its contents that we wanted to keep the dialog surronding this theme going on our blog. In her essay, Nancy Jooyoun Kim explores the experience of being a writer who is often derided by peers for not being universal enough. We hope you enjoy reading. To read more on this theme, visit our blog and buy or Winter 2014 issue (print or ebook).

Alberta Clipper: 7/7/15: “Intermediary” by Pattiann Rogers

July 7, 1983, in Lincoln was a scorcher. Temperatures reached 91° Fahrenheit; the month would go on to reach a high of 106°. But while the weather was warm, the political atmosphere was frigid: The United States and the Soviet Union were locked in the middle of the Cold War. Tensions on both sides were incredibly high and the drastic seemed possible. Within this climate, ten-year-old Samantha Smith wrote a letter to the Soviet Union's newly appointed leader, Yuri Andropov, seeking to understand the conflict. Her letter read:

Dear Mr. Andropov,

Alberta Clipper: 6/30/15: “Shifting Winds” by James C. Kilgore

June 30th, 1936, marks the publication date of Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With The Wind. Although today its reception is mixed—some still love it, while others find its controversial aspects more than troubling—it remains historically important, and if nothing else, it shows us the headway we’ve made as a society. “Shifting Winds” by James C. Kilgore appeared in the summer issue of Prairie Schooner in 1969, with the weather in Nebraska not surprisingly heating up. June saw highs of 99 degrees Fahrenheit. James C. Kilgore (1928-1988), a poet and essayist, worked in the English Department at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio where he was extremely active in founding new and diverse writing associations in and around the Cleveland metro area. He published several works throughout his life, and was named Ohio Poet of the Year in 1982.

"Nonfiction is the most intimate space": An Interview with Rigoberto Gonzalez

by Sarah Fawn Montgomery

Below is an interview with the judge of our Summer Creative Nonfiction Contest, Rigoberto Gonzalez. We're accepting submissions through August 1st, looking for all types of creative nonfiction essays, up to 5,000 words. Winner receives $250 and publication in our Spring issue. Click here to submit.


1. You write and publish in a variety of genres—poetry, fiction, nonfiction, children’s literature—so what is it about the genre of nonfiction that speaks to you? What does the genre offer you as a writer? As a reader, teacher, human?

Women and the Global Imagination: Unveiling of Self

by Sholeh Wolpé

In our Winter 2014 issue Alicia Ostriker curated a poetry portfolio on Women and the Global Imagination, and we were so struck by its contents that we wanted to keep the dialog surronding this theme going on our blog. In her essay, Sholeh Wolpé examines the work of Iranian woman poets who have used transgression to push up against the boundaries their culture had placed on writing by women. We hope you enjoy reading. To read more on this theme, visit our store and buy or Winter 2014 issue (print or ebook), or become a subscriber to Prairie Schooner today.

Women and the Global Imagination: Laudomia Bonanni and The Reprisal

by Fiona Sze-Lorrain

In our Winter 2014 issue Alicia Ostriker curated a poetry portfolio on Women and the Global Imagination, and we were so struck by its contents that we wanted to keep the dialog surronding this theme going on our blog. In her essay, Fiona Sze-Lorrain examines the work of Italian post-war woman writer Laudomia Bonanni. We hope you enjoy reading. If you like what you see, please become a subscriber to Prairie Schooner today. To take part in the dialog, follow and interact with us on Twitter.

Briefly Noted - May 28, 2015

Quick-to-Read Reviews

Monthly book reviews in brief from the staff of Prairie Schooner and associates.

Vol. 4 Issue 3. May 28, 2015. Ed. Paul Clark.

City of Eternal Spring by Afaa Michael Weaver | Reviewed by Karen An-hwei Lee Unexploded by Alison Macleod | Reviewed by Jennifer S. Deayton Brown Girl, Brownstones by Paule Marshall | Reviewed by Jyotsna Sreenivasan

Women and the Global Imagination: At Full Thrust

Carol P. Bartold

In our Winter 2014 issue Alicia Ostriker curated a poetry portfolio on Women and the Global Imagination, and we were so struck by its contents that we wanted to keep the dialog surronding this theme going on our blog. In her essay, Carol P. Bartold recalls the space race from a child's perspective. We hope you enjoy reading. If you like what you see, please become a subscriber to Prairie Schooner today. To take part in the dialog, follow and interact with us on Twitter.

Women and the Global Imagination: Carmen Boullosa

by Jeremy Paden

In our Winter 2014 issue Alicia Ostriker curated a poetry portfolio on Women and the Global Imagination, and we were so struck by its contents that we wanted to keep the dialog surronding this theme going on our blog. In his essay, Jeremy Paden considers Carmen Boullosa's epic poetry and how it comfortably spans across the personal and the politcal. We hope you enjoy reading. If you like what you see, please become a subscriber to Prairie Schooner today. To take part in the dialog, follow and interact with us on Twitter.

Women and the Global Imagination: The True Story of My Grandmother's Breasts

by Maureen Langloss

In our Winter 2014 issue Alicia Ostriker curated a poetry portfolio on Women and the Global Imagination, and we were so struck by its contents that we wanted to keep the dialog surronding this theme going on our blog. In her essay, Maureen Langloss moves through cultural texts and her family history in an important meditation on sexual assault. We hope you enjoy reading. If you like what you see, please become a subscriber to Prairie Schooner today. To take part in the dialog, follow and interact with us on Twitter.

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